A blog for busy corporate executives wanting to improve the leadership culture of their organization.

  • 68% of your employees may not want to be there. According to Gallup, only 32% of employees are engaged in the American workplace. Worldwide, it’s even worse: 87% of employees are disengaged at significant levels. The leaders and managers in your company clearly face an uphill climb to build more productive teams.

  • The people in your company that most often achieve leadership positions are the ones who work hard to produce results. But the results your leaders want won’t depend solely on their hard work. If they only count hard work as success, your leaders and managers can get tunnel vision. Your leaders need more to get the results they want. They need to think about getting the results they want by building the team they need.

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  • Progress requires change. That's a fact. As your company grows, your teams will have to change to move forward and achieve results. Your leaders can’t make the progress your company needs to make while standing still. One change progress has brought to companies like yours is the development of virtual teams. Teams empowered to work together outside a physical workplace can help your managers grow, but they can also jeopardize that growth if leaders forget the one thing they must remember to make virtual teams work.

  • A business executive. A softball coach. A classroom teacher. A volunteer coordinator. A parent. Whether you’re one of these things or all of these things, one thing remains true: You are a leader. But where are you on your leadership journey, and where do you go from here? Over my years of teaching about leadership, that question exists at the heart of so many leaders. Everyone wants to know where they stand and how to get to the next level. And you are probably no different!

  • ​We train our brain by the things we do. For example, experienced taxicab drivers have an abnormally large hippocampus, the portion of the brain responsible for navigation. Veteran violinists or keyboardists have an expanded motor cortex, the area of the brain associated with fine motor skills. Our brain is literally shaped by what we repeatedly do.

  • Do you know anyone who’s always busy but never seems to get anything done? Maybe this person works for you. How do you lead someone who’s motivated and a doer, but still doesn’t contribute any meaningful results?